Conjuring up Mariel Hemingway
on a Detroit sidewalk

So my friend, Jocelyn, and I had just finished a Happy Moment at the Doubletree Round Bar (We didn’t have an hour, but we had wine, cheese and great gumbo just the same). jocelyn

We headed to the sidewalk, I remembered aloud that Mariel Hemingway, whom I had interviewed five days before,  was slated to speak at the hotel the next day. She was promoting her new movie “Running from Crazy,” and I had just spoken to her about “the Hemingway curse,” which referred to seven members of her family killing themselves. She talked about embracing health and happiness to change her own fate.

Suddenly, I turned and bumped into Mariel Hemingway! She had just arrived and was pulling her suitcase from a car to the front doors.

Mariel“Ms. Hemingway?”

She turned, and I introduced myself, reminded her of our phone interview. She remembered and said kind words about the questions I had asked. And I did something I rarely do. I  let J take a photo of the two of us.

It was a brief moment, not unlike hundreds of others in my line of work. Ms. Hemingway headed in, and J and I continued  down the sidewalk.  Suddenly, nearly in unison, J and I both began chanting “Denzel Washington! Denzel Washington! Denzel Washington!”

Well, it worked with Mariel Hemingway, so we had to give it a try, right?

We had a good laugh at the universe and made a pact to return to that spot. And just in case there was a crack in that sidewalk that lets us conjure up the people we want most to see, I’ve got a list:

Michael Ealy!

Idris Elba!

Matt Damon!

Terrence Howard!

Brad Pitt!

Denzel Washington!

ROCHELLE RILEY is a writer and blogger whose posts here are about her personal adventures. You can read her columns at www.freep.com/rochelleriley and follow her on Twitter @rochelleriley.

 

Finding kindred spirits – and card stock –
in an office supply store

You meet the nicest people in the strangest places.

This time, I was at an office supply store to buy card stock for a church project. As I searched the shelves unsuccessfully for what I needed, I overheard a couple next to me talking about card stock. They had been looking for a while and hadn’t found what they wanted either.

1After five or six more minutes in a deserted aisle, I dialed the store’s number and reached customer service. Suddenly, the store intercom blasted  that a customer call was waiting. Apparently that isn’t allowed to happen. I watched a clerk rush to the phone and happily say:

“How can I help you?”

“We’re in the paper aisle and need some help,” I said. “Could you please send someone over?”

I heard the clerk laughingly and loudly tell someone “She’s calling from the store!”

Another clerk walked quickly over to greet us.

“Hi, I’m looking for white card stock, and I only need 40 sheets. Do you have anything close to that?” I pointed to the shelf filled with packs of 250 and 500 sheets.

Nope, he told me. I had to buy a 250-sheet pack.

Suddenly, the guy standing nearby said: “Well, that’s what we’re looking for, and we only need 80 sheets! Why don’t we split a pack?”

He was half of a really nice couple, the kind of people you’re glad to run into, the kind of people who say hello as you pass by.

A few minutes later, we paid for OUR paper at the register, and then split it in half: about 125 sheets each. Then we went our separate ways.

I don’t know why that moment made me feel so good, except this: Three strangers joined together and shared a little victory against a retail machine that doesn’t always work the way we want.

Yay us.

ROCHELLE RILEY is a writer and blogger whose posts here are about her personal adventures. You can read her columns at www.freep.com/rochelleriley and follow her on Twitter @rochelleriley.

 

Use Lenten Season to become a good memory

1962651_10152085125563381_1856722289_nNo matter what church I’ve attended for worship – AME Zion, United Methodist, Baptist, United Church of Christ, we have always commemorated the Season of Lent, which begins on Ash Wednesday and is a time of penance, reflection and fasting to prepare for the celebration of Christ’s resurrection on Easter Sunday.

That resurrection is the door He left open for our redemption. It represents the moment that even the greatest nonbeliever understood who He was and whose He was.

But fasting doesn’t always mean from food. Many of the Christians fast rom something for 40 days, a sacrifice that helps them be faithful to the season and to count down to redemption.

I’ve given up something every year.  This year is no different.

Except that I’m sharing my time of sacrifice with a friend.

This year, my dear friend, Melia and I chose each other’s sacrifice. I shall not reveal hers, but she chose for me something that means I will have more time and money to devote to worthier causes than myself: No movies for 40 days and nights.

kinopoisk.ruThat’s right – no matinees, no $8 popcorns, no films.

That means I won’t see The 300: “Rise of an Empire” until after it’s been in theaters for weeks.  I predicted the success of “The 300,” a brilliant re-imagined account of the Battle of Thermopylae, when King Leonidas led 300 Spartans  into battle against Xerses, a magically powerful Persian who led a 300,000 man army.  The film earned more than $450 million at the box office. Its sequel, while just as flawed and just as historically accurate, will be just as good, I think.

I also won’t see “Veronica Mars,” the film I’ve been waiting for for almost seven years. It’s based on a CW TV show that I LOVED, and I was thrilled by the Kickstarter campaign to fund its filming.

MV5BMTQ4MDc0Mjg4OV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwODk3NjYyMTE@._V1_SX214_I am one of those people who sees movies on opening day, on Friday nights, before the social network has anointed or killed them. I go to premieres as often as I can to see movies before they’re tainted by opinions I don’t trust.

I love movies.

So at first, I was horrified by Melia’s choice. But then I realize she chose exactly right, and I am grateful. I’ll save countless hours at at least $200 bucks, which I’m sure a charity could use more.

I have another sacrifice I’m making that is between God and me. It is a spiritual and special thing that probably means more to God.

But please use the season, whether you believe in only this world or this and more, to reflect on who you are and who you can be.

And no matter what age you are, please find ways to be a good memory after you’re gone!

ROCHELLE RILEY is a writer and blogger whose posts here are about her personal adventures. You can read her columns at www.freep.com/rochelleriley and follow her on Twitter @rochelleriley.

Remembering Angelo Henderson;
making sure his legacy lives

Whenever you talked to Angelo Henderson, on the phone or in person, you had to work to keep up.

He talked at 78 rpm; so if you were chatting at 33 1/3, you had to increase your speed. (For anyone younger than 30, those numbers refers to old records. For anyone younger than 20, records are big CDS.  For teenagers, CDs are something people used to put music on before iTunes.)

The funeral program from Angelo Henderson's Homegoing Celebration.

The funeral program from Angelo Henderson’s Homegoing Celebration.

Angelo, who lived life at a hundred miles an hour, just never stopped. He didn’t rest until his death on February 15. That’s because knew he had a lot to do. He, after all, had five jobs. And he was successful at all of them.

He was a journalist who rose to the top of the industry, winning a Pulitzer Prize in 1999.

He was one of the most popular radio talk show hosts in Michigan.

He was an activist who co-founded a community group, the Detroit 300, that literally changed the way people lived in troubled Detroit neighborhoods.

He was a minister who heeded God’s calling and became a minister, while continuing all of his other work.

But his most important job was as husband and father.

Writing the words “Angelo died” out loud still doesn’t make it real. I needed it to be a false rumor – like the one Wikipedia afflicts on Sinbad every few years, not for his friends, but for his wife and son, Felecia and Grant.

I’ve never seen any couple more in love than Angelo and Felecia, a fellow journalist who was his perfect match, calm to his tornado, grace to his flurry.

And Grant? I’m so glad Angelo got to see his son become the young man they groomed him to be, a 20-year-old college student with real basketball skills.

There is a scene in the film Remember the Titans where Denzel Washington, as Coach Herman Boone, talks to the media about losing a player before the big state championship.

“You cannot replace a Gerry Bertier – as a player or person,” the coach tells gathered media.

Well, Detroit is our team. And you cannot replace an Angelo Henderson. All we can do now is to let him continue to serve as role model and inspiration.

Everything Angelo did, he did in the name of Jesus.

Everything we do should be the same, except, additionally, we should do it — for Angelo.

A group of Angelo’s friends from 14 different states across the country will be working to not just preserve Angelo’s legacy but to lift it up. to find ways to ensure that he is always remembered and to help others as he always did.

Stay tuned for details. But know this: We might, in his honor, be working at a hundred miles an hour.

To join the Angelo Henderson Legacy Project, send an email to Rochelle Riley at rochelleriley@aol.com.

ROCHELLE RILEY is a writer and blogger whose posts here are about her personal adventures. You can read her columns at www.freep.com/rochelleriley and follow her on Twitter @rochelleriley. You can find her Free Press page here on Facebook.

End of financial fast is beginning
of different economic living

So what happened to the end of the 21-day financial fast, you wonder?

I completed it. But more important, I paid attention to the things I learned on it.

I paid off my car (and am about to pay off one of the only two credit cards I have).

I do not buy anything major now without giving myself a week to think about it.

And I’m cleaning up my house and life, getting rid of all the crap and not replacing it with things I don’t need.

Screen Shot 2014-01-18 at 12.09.35 PMWhen I began Washington Post columnist Michelle Singletary’s 21-Day Financial Fast, I figured I’d save a few bucks, learn a few things and go back to business as usual.

I saved a lot. I learned more about myself than my money. And things will never be the same.

Example? I went to have my annual teeth cleaning. I’m a big baby at the dentist’s office. The hygienist said “You want nitrous (the wonderful gas, nitrous oxide that makes you not care that she’s in your mouth)? Rather than immediately say “Yes!”, I asked “How much?”

It was $40. I said no.

What?!

I needed a new wallet. I went shopping in my closet. I found one with the tag still on, and I have had great compliments on the style and color. I don’t even remember buying it.

My next task is to clean the garage, so I can take the stuff I have in storage and put it in the garage. That stuff has been there since April 2012 because I didn’t have time to deal with it. When I realized that the money I’d spent holding onto it would have paid for a trip to Paris, I got motivated.

checkbookSo I want to thank Michelle and the fast. And she’ll be happy to know that, unlike some people who might not have wanted people to know what they were doing, I talked to everybody. The best encouragement I got was a gift from a dear friend, who knew that I would be experiencing several special occasions occurring during the fast, including my birthday. She gave me a checkbook whose checks were actually dollar bills.

“Snack on these and stick to your fast,” she told me.

And the moderator at my church now wants our entire church council to do the fast and give the proceeds to the church.

Now that’s spreading the good word and good habits in a good way.

ROCHELLE RILEY is a writer and blogger whose posts here are about her personal adventures. You can read her columns at www.freep.com/rochelleriley and follow her on Twitter @rochelleriley.